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<<written & performed by byron yee>>


Yee Bing Quai arrives in Boston harbor aboard the SS Yarmouth on May 12, 1938 and is held in East Boston, Massachusetts.

After receiving some medical treatment, he is interrogated on June 15th, 1938 by Inspector Charles E. Golding.

The full transcript can be found in the menu bar on the left. PDFs of the entire file can be found HERE.

He is asked a number of questions including:

Q:  When did your alleged father first come to the U.S.?  A:  I do not know.  He came before I was born.

Q:  Has your alleged father made any trips to China since he first came to the U.S.?  A:  I have never seen my father - my mother told me that he returned to the U.S. in CR 14. (Year in Chinese calendar)

Q:  If you have never seen your alleged father, how do you recognize the photograph attached to the affidavit which you present, as being that of your alleged father?  A:  There is a bust photograph of my father dressed in American clothes, enclosed in a frame with a glass front, about 6 x 8 inches, which is hanging on the back wall of the center room of my house in HIN Village, HPD, china.  That photograph of my father has been hanging there as long as I can remember.  My mother told me that it was a picture of my father which he sent to her a long time ago.

Later he is asked:

Q:  Describe our house in HIN Village, HPD, China?  A:  It is a five room house built of cement; with a large and small door; large door faces the head: small door faces the tail; it has red-tile floors throughout the house.

Yee Wee Thing is called in to testify and following exchange occurs:

Q:  How many houses in HIN village do yo own?  A:  Only one house.

Q:  Did your wife write you a description of your house in HIN Village, HPD, China?  A:  My wife wrote and told me that the house was built of burnt brick.  She did not say how many rooms were in it.

Q:  Why should your wife write and tell you what the house was built of and not tell you how many rooms were in the house?  A:  I don't know why.

Q:  Didn't you think it rather peculiar that your wife wrote and told you what the house was built of and not tell you how many rooms were in that house?  A:  I don't know why - she should have told me how many rooms were in it.

Q:  Isn't it a fact that your wife never wrote you any such letter at all telling you about any such house in HIN Village, HPD, China?  A:  Yes, she wrote me a letter telling me that the house was built of burnt brick.

Q:  Are houses in China built of anything else but burnt brick?  A:  Yes, some houses are burnt of concrete; some houses are built of clay; and some of stone.

Q:  Can you give any reason why the applicant and you should disagree as to what your house in HIN village, HPD, China, is built of?  A:  I don't know why -- I can't explain it.

The following day, Yee Bing Quai is called back in and the following exchange occurs:

Q:  You testified here the other day that your house in HIN Village, HPD, China was built of cement.  Is that correct?  A:  Yes

Q:  What color is your house?  A:  Kind of a light yellow color.

Q:  Is that the general color of the cement houses in China?  A:  Yes

Q:  Did you ever see any burnt-brick houses?  A:  Yes

Q:  What color are burnt-brick houses?  A:  Kind of a light green color.

Q:  Are all the other houses in HIN Village the same color as your house?  A:  No, the other houses are built of burnt brick.

Q:  Your alleged father testified here today that your mother had written him a letter after your family moved to HIN Village, HPD, China, that her house, that is the house to which you moved to with your mother, was built of burnt brick; how do you explain that?  A:  Only the outside of my house is covered with cement; the inside of it is made of burnt brick.

Q:  Why is the outside of your house covered with cement?  A:  I don't know.

Q:  Why did you say your house was built of cement if it only has a cement covering on the outside?  A:  From the outside it looks like it was built of cement, so I just said it was built of cement, but it is built of burnt brick on the inside.

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